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zeldathemes

I'm a graduate of animal and veterinary biosciences and am now undertaking my doctor of veterinary medicine masters degree at the university of melbourne.

This blog is a record of my experiences while studying for my dream job. every all nighter, every caffeine fuelled early morning and every exciting adventure.
If you'd like to know more follow the link at the top.
Up there you'll also find links to my personal blog, and my amazing and inspirational animals.

If you're a veterinary blog i'd love you to message me so i can follow you :)
CONSULTATIONS, AUSCULTATIONS & PALPATIONS
markscherz:

prettydeadstuff:

Dog skulls

THIS IS SO COOL

markscherz:

prettydeadstuff:

Dog skulls

THIS IS SO COOL

molecularlifesciences:

tabletopwhale:

I made an animated infographic about muscles! You can check out the full version here or get the poster here :)

Killer animation!

southernsnowdogs:

brown—hound:

We see a lot of greyhounds in my clinic… They are pretty much not dogs… Nothing is the same with a grey. They can be in perfect health one day, and dying of liver failure the next. Its incredibly hard working with them medical wise.

But love them I do! <3 They are very fragile and sensitive dogs, with hearts of pure gold and legs like a kangaroo. The 4 we have here are just a delight 

southernsnowdogs:

brown—hound:

We see a lot of greyhounds in my clinic… They are pretty much not dogs… Nothing is the same with a grey. They can be in perfect health one day, and dying of liver failure the next. Its incredibly hard working with them medical wise.

But love them I do! <3 
They are very fragile and sensitive dogs, with hearts of pure gold and legs like a kangaroo. The 4 we have here are just a delight 

immense-immunology-insight:

7 reasons why cancer cells are immortal
1. Cancer cells don’t age.Normal cells go through senescence through shortening of telomeres with every cell division. Cancer cells however have telomerase that will sustain the telomere length of the chromosomes rendering the cell virtually immortal.2. Cancer cells have a way around apoptosis, their programmed cell death.They overexpress antiapoptotic molecules and can multiply forever.3. The Grim Reaper can’t recognize them.The Natural killer cells, or the Grim Reaper; are supposed to cause death of the tumor cells. However, cancer cells remain undetected because they down regulate their MHC proteins or use decoy proteins to look innocent.4. If recognized, the Grim Reaper can’t kill them.Tumor cells block the death receptor pathway and directly interfere with the perforin/granzyme pathway. That is why, natural killer cells fail to kill them.5. Cancer cells don’t need anything.Cancer cells are self sufficient on growth factors. This means that they can continue to proliferate and divide independently, as opposed to normal cells that need external growth factors.6. And if they do need something, they order it to come to them.When cancer cells need of oxygen and nutrients, they stimulate angiogenesis; which is inducing growth of new blood vessels.7. They have metabolic super powers.The metabolism of malignant cells is usually more anaerobic than that of normal cells and is greatly accelerated. Malignant cells have the ability to withstand hypoxic conditions. They have increased glucose and amino acid uptake. In addition, they have high levels of hexokinase increasing their glucose utilization.

immense-immunology-insight:

7 reasons why cancer cells are immortal

1. Cancer cells don’t age.
Normal cells go through senescence through shortening of telomeres with every cell division. Cancer cells however have telomerase that will sustain the telomere length of the chromosomes rendering the cell virtually immortal.

2. Cancer cells have a way around apoptosis, their programmed cell death.
They overexpress antiapoptotic molecules and can multiply forever.

3. The Grim Reaper can’t recognize them.
The Natural killer cells, or the Grim Reaper; are supposed to cause death of the tumor cells. However, cancer cells remain undetected because they down regulate their MHC proteins or use decoy proteins to look innocent.

4. If recognized, the Grim Reaper can’t kill them.
Tumor cells block the death receptor pathway and directly interfere with the perforin/granzyme pathway. That is why, natural killer cells fail to kill them.

5. Cancer cells don’t need anything.
Cancer cells are self sufficient on growth factors. This means that they can continue to proliferate and divide independently, as opposed to normal cells that need external growth factors.

6. And if they do need something, they order it to come to them.
When cancer cells need of oxygen and nutrients, they stimulate angiogenesis; which is inducing growth of new blood vessels.

7. They have metabolic super powers.
The metabolism of malignant cells is usually more anaerobic than that of normal cells and is greatly accelerated. Malignant cells have the ability to withstand hypoxic conditions. They have increased glucose and amino acid uptake. In addition, they have high levels of hexokinase increasing their glucose utilization.

Want to be rich and famous? Don’t become a veterinarian. Want to have a career where you can wear designer clothes that stay pressed and clean all day? Don’t become a veterinarian. Want to eat a big fat slice of humble pie on a regular basis? THIS IS THE CAREER FOR YOU!!

Seriously…the veterinary profession tends to keep you humble. You’ll make a tricky diagnosis and start strutting around like you are the next Dr. House one day, and then miss a case of ear mites the next. You’ll be a kick ass surgeon and rework a cat’s intestinal tract on Monday, and then on Wednesday you’ll puncture a bladder while performing a routine spay. One week you will be the golden child, the one that clients absolutely love and adore, and the next week you’ll be getting nastygrams, or letters from the Better Business Bureau.

Make no mistake…this career will humble you. When I graduated from vet school, I was on top of the world. I was going to be the best veterinarian ever…clients would adore me, animals would calm in my magnificent presence. They would write books one day about my awesomeness.

(In reality, I was fairly terrified my first year out and oftentimes had no idea what I was doing. Of course, I couldn’t let clients or my technicians see that, so I learned to fake it pretty well. I was sort of like the little weeny Chihuahua that barks really loud at a passing Rottweiler…I sounded tough but often felt like running away with my tail between my legs)

A few months out of school, a 5 month old pit bull presented to the clinic with a two day history of vomiting and not wanting to eat. It did not have diarrhea. Those of you that are experienced vets probably know already what the diagnosis is. I had no clue.

I did take a history and performed a physical exam. The owner assured me that the dog was “totally vaccinated.” The dog was dehydrated, lethargic and actually vomited during the exam. I was certain it was a foreign body or some kind of toxicity. I recommended taking x-rays of the abdomen.

As I was confidently walking the dog back to the x-ray room, one of my technicians asked me why I wasn’t testing the dog for Parvovirus. I glared at her a bit, puffed myself up and told her that it couldn’tpossibly be parvo, because the dog didn’t have diarrhea! DUH. Also, the owner said it was fully vaccinated. DOUBLE DUH. The technician stated that a lot of times Parvo dogs came in initially vomiting. I rolled my eyes and told her to get the x-rays.

As they were x-raying the dog, it puked a few more times. As they were developing the x-rays it sprayed bloody diarrhea over every surface of the x-ray room. I would later find some on the ceiling.

Well, as it turns out the x-rays were normal other than showing very angry looking small intestines. I muttered under my breath that there was NO WAY it was Parvo, but reluctantly allowed the technician to run a Parvo test. Low and behold, it most definitely was Parvo. I had just paraded a dog with a VERY contagious disease all around the hospital. The dog had sprayed Parvo infested diarrhea all over the imaging room.

I learned from that episode to A) Never trust an owner when they say their dog is “vaccinated.” B) Parvo dogs can present initially with just vomiting. C) Listen to your technicians.

Another time my head got pretty swollen because a client actually requested me to change her dog’s splint. It was a little Chihuahua with a broken radius that my boss had been treating by splinting. The splints he put on kept falling off, which annoyed the client. I happened to put on a splint that stayed, and she was singing my praises in the lobby.

I took the dog to the back, hemmed and hawed to my staff about my vastly superior bandaging technique, and even managed to put two little red hearts made out of vet wrap on the splint. The client loved it! I was awesome! I walked on water! As she was bowing down to my immense greatness the Chihuahua shook its leg a little bit and the splint came flying off. Oops. The client didn’t really care so much about the vet wrap hearts at that point.

I have tried to spay a neutered male cat. I’ve accidentally cut into a bladder during a spay. I’ve raved to clients about how AWESOME they are doing with weight loss on their fat cat only to find out that the cat is a diabetic. I once did a physical exam on a newly adopted Boxer, and told the owners it was in great health and there were no abnormalities. They called the next day, pretty upset because overnight their “normal” dog gave birth to 12 puppies.

On a more somber note, I’ve made mistakes that have resulted in the death of my patients. A little Labrador puppy was bitten pretty badly by a neighbor dog. I saw some deep puncture wounds, but not much else. I cleaned her wounds and put her on antibiotics. I missed the hole that had been torn in her intestines, and she died a few days later of a raging abdominal infection. I misdiagnosed a cat with asthma, when it had heart failure. That night when the owner attempted to give him medication for the asthma, the cat died of heart failure, most likely secondary to the stress of medication. I missed that a dog I put on Rimadyl was also on steroids, and ended up causing the dog to suffer a perforated stomach ulcer.

I even had a cat die after I neutered it. I still to this day am not sure what happened, but I know that he was very little, and I was “fairly” sure I was cutting a testicle. Whatever it was that I cut wouldn’t stop bleeding and he died a few days later. A cat neuter is considered to be one of the simplest surgeries we do as veterinarians.

Now, I know you are all thinking that after knowing all this there is no way in heck you would use me as a veterinarian. Here’s the thing though….we all have messed up. We have all missed diagnoses, screwed up a surgery, given a wrong medication. My grandma always says that is why they call it the “Practice” of medicine.

As horrible as some of the mistakes I’ve made have been, I have learned from every single one. Today, I would not miss that Parvo diagnosis. I treat dog bite wounds very seriously and always look for deeper injuries. I am careful to try and differentiate a cat with asthma and a cat with heart disease. Every time I neuter a cat I think of my neuter that went horribly wrong, and I remind myself to not treat it lightly even though it is such a straight forward surgery.

I also don’t let myself get too cocky or confident. I’ll smile when I make a tricky diagnosis or do a tough surgery, but I don’t strut. I know that probably within a day or so I’m going to do something that will knock me back down to earth. When I hear of mistakes other veterinarians have made, instead of feeling superior, I nod with sympathy and think back on the mess ups I have had.

Phyllis Theroux, in Night Lights states that “Mistakes are the usual bridge between inexperience and wisdom.” If you are a new veterinarian or technician, give up on the idea that you are going to be perfect. You will make mistakes. You will harm a patient because of those mistakes. Learn from your mistakes. Don’t blame others, or incessantly beat up on yourself. Take a deep breath, file it away in your memory, and keep carrying on.

  #vet students    #vets    #veterinarian    #vet school    #vet nursing    #vet tech    #veterinary medicine    #i love this blog    #practice    #veterinary practice  

really important, and not nearly well enough addressed in most vet schools.

  #vet school    #stress    #vet student    #vet    #vet life    #vet medicine    #university    #veterinary  

equinevetadventures:

In the OR with Dr. Patty Hogan (part 2) since everyone enojoyed part 1 so much, here is a Arthroscopic Removal of a Plantar OCD Fragment

Note the differences in the positioning and preparation :)

usmlenotes:

Have some fun with Medicine!

usmlenotes:

Have some fun with Medicine!

alldogownersshouldknow:

Symptoms of bloat include:

  • hard, swollen abdomen that may make a hollow sound if tapped
  • retching that produces no vomit OR produces foamy, white vomit
  • drooling/salivating excessively
  • whining
  • pacing/restlessness
  • lethargy
  • stiff-legged walk

If your dog shows signs of having bloat, call your vet IMMEDIATELY. Every second counts. Bloat is extremely painful and without quick veterinary intervention your dog will probably not survive.

Check out this video of an akita in the middle to late stages of bloat.

Check out this article on what bloat is, the varieties of bloat, its symptoms, and the typical treatment plans.

The best predictor of a dog’s chances of getting bloat are its relatives. If your dogs family has had bloat, your dog is at an increased risk. Other risk factors include:

  • deep, narrow chested dogs
  • feeding to soon before or after exercising
  • raised feeding bowls
  • gulping food/eating too quickly
  • eating one or two large meals per day
  • overeating
  • overdrinking
  • dry food diet

dirtyberd:

huffingtonpost:

Frostie dancing is by far the cutest thing to hit the Internet. Check it out here.

(Source: Edgar’s Mission)

crying

thepacificparrotlet:

wordsonbirds:

becausebirds:

This GIF shows how the toucan releases heat using its beak to cool itself off.
The toucan beak isn’t just beautiful, it’s also an adjustable thermal radiator that the bird uses to warm and cool itself. When the bird is hot, the blood vessels in their beak open up to allow more circulation to enable heat to escape. Birds can’t sweat so they have to come up with some life hacks to get the job done. [video]

This is absolutely fascinating. It seems so obvious that the beak would be a good way to radiate heat out, but I’d never even thought of that.

That is awesome!

thepacificparrotlet:

wordsonbirds:

becausebirds:

This GIF shows how the toucan releases heat using its beak to cool itself off.

The toucan beak isn’t just beautiful, it’s also an adjustable thermal radiator that the bird uses to warm and cool itself. When the bird is hot, the blood vessels in their beak open up to allow more circulation to enable heat to escape. Birds can’t sweat so they have to come up with some life hacks to get the job done. [video]

This is absolutely fascinating. It seems so obvious that the beak would be a good way to radiate heat out, but I’d never even thought of that.

That is awesome!

biologizeable:

brb crying over extinct animals

cg800051:

Urogenital system of the Blue-fronted Amazon 作者 AnkatsArtThese Illustrations are part of a project about the arteficial insemination of birds. For this project I illustrated the birds themselves, their skeletons, their urogenitalsystems and the process of the arteficial insemination executed by a team of veterinarians. I used the Blue-fronted Amazon as an example because it is a common pet parrot. But the new method of arteficial insemination was especially developed for very rare species like the Spix’s Macaw. Nonetheless the method can be adapted to a lot of other birds.

cg800051:

Urogenital system of the Blue-fronted Amazon 作者 AnkatsArt
These Illustrations are part of a project about the arteficial insemination of birds. For this project I illustrated the birds themselves, their skeletons, their urogenitalsystems and the process of the arteficial insemination executed by a team of veterinarians. I used the Blue-fronted Amazon as an example because it is a common pet parrot. But the new method of arteficial insemination was especially developed for very rare species like the Spix’s Macaw. Nonetheless the method can be adapted to a lot of other birds.

  #avian    #bird    #urogenital system    #veterinary    #avian vet    #vet med    #pre vet    #vet student  
bl-ossomed:

peterfromtexas:

Heart surgeon after 23-hour (successful) long heart transplantation. His assistant is sleeping in the corner

Wow

bl-ossomed:

peterfromtexas:

Heart surgeon after 23-hour (successful) long heart transplantation. His assistant is sleeping in the corner

Wow