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zeldathemes

I'm a graduate of animal and veterinary biosciences and am now undertaking my doctor of veterinary medicine masters degree at the university of melbourne.

This blog is a record of my experiences while studying for my dream job. every all nighter, every caffeine fuelled early morning and every exciting adventure.
If you'd like to know more follow the link at the top.
Up there you'll also find links to my personal blog, and my amazing and inspirational animals.

If you're a veterinary blog i'd love you to message me so i can follow you :)
CONSULTATIONS, AUSCULTATIONS & PALPATIONS
  #botulism    #horses    #equines    #veterinary medicine    #hoovesandheartbeats  
thisfuturemd:

EKG

thisfuturemd:

EKG

medicalillustration:

Week 46: Surgical tools | Hand Surgery, Orthopedics

Original sketches from OR sketchbook were rough: the primary focus at that point was to depict how the surgeon handles these tools and their overall shape.  They were then redrawn and cleaned up in Photoshop.

**feel free to use the close-up photo I took of curved surgical scissors, needle driver, micro scissors, and surgical forceps for your own reference :)

gemmacorrell:

(via Four Eyes Comic Strip on GoComics.com)

gemmacorrell:

(via Four Eyes Comic Strip on GoComics.com)

irksome.

when an assignment is specifically supposed to be “one page”.. and a bunch of people hand in shit that’s two-three pages. I want to smack them. 

equinevetadventures:

(credit to: TheHorse.Com)

equinevetadventures:

(credit to: TheHorse.Com)

My Highest Level of Understanding of Anesthesia Monitoring Devices

ourlifeinvetschool:

                                            image

equinevetadventures:

In the OR with Dr. Patty Hogan

(I thought this might be interesting for all the riders that don’t know what an OR for horses looks like and I like the B&W pictures)

hoovesandheartbeats:

There are two main branches of vessels below the carpus in the equine lower limb. Between the metacarpal and the interoseus (suspensory ligament) is the lateral/medial metacarpal vessels (2). Between the suspensory ligament and the deep digital flexor tendon is the lateral/medial palmar vessels (this is the main artery to the digit and hoof)(1).

The medial/lateral palmar vessels continue axially where they split into the medial/lateral digital arteries just above the fetlock.  The digital arties travel over the abaxial surface of the seasmoids (where they are palpable and where digital pules are frequently taken) and continue into the hoof as they travel with each side of the suspensory ligament.  The lateral digital artery is joined by the metacarpal arteries above the seasmoid bones.

Image source: one,two

Content source: Dyce 4th ed.

adventuresingay:

Can we please all just agree to call veterinary clinics “in-fur-maries”

  #veterinary    #vetstudent  
prevethead:

Here’s an x-ray of a pregnant mama cat. She was left in a box at the front door of the clinic and she’s so fat I just had to snap an xray to count the babies. This is one of my favorite xrays to take. I counted four or five babies. They should be born any day now!

prevethead:

Here’s an x-ray of a pregnant mama cat. She was left in a box at the front door of the clinic and she’s so fat I just had to snap an xray to count the babies. This is one of my favorite xrays to take. I counted four or five babies. They should be born any day now!

  #Vet Tech    #veterinary    #xray    #radiograph    #rads    #kittens    #pregnant    #cat  
did-you-kno:

Source

did-you-kno:

Source

elegantbuffalo:

Fossilised bones of a dinosaur believed to be the largest creature ever to walk the Earth have been unearthed in Argentina, palaeontologists say.

Based on its huge thigh bones, it was 40m (130ft) long and 20m (65ft) tall.

Weighing in at 77 tonnes, it was as heavy as 14 African elephants, and seven tonnes heavier than the previous record holder, Argentinosaurus.

Scientists believe it is a new species of titanosaur - an enormous long-neck herbivore dating from the Late Cretaceous period.  They unearthed the partial skeletons of seven individuals - about 150 bones in total - all in “remarkable condition”

I could never be a specialist. I’d die without the variety of general practice!
Doc, summing up why, in an increasingly specialized field, some of us don’t want to become specialists!
  #variety is the spice of life    #veterinary    #specialization    #general practice  
the-vet-life:

mylifeasaprevetstudent:

the-vet-life:

A dog was suspected to have possibly eaten a box of rat-bait in the garden, and was brought to the clinic.
Rat baits are separated into 1st and 2nd generations, but the general mechanism they involve is the blocking of the vitamin K pathway, stopping the production of clotting factors II and VII. Most products nowadays are 2nd generation, as they only require one dose to be fatal, instead of multiple cumulative doses.
Animals that ingest rodenticides suffer from internal haemorrhaging and external blood loss, and can die within hours (if 2nd generation) to days/weeks (if 1st generation).
An activated clotting time (ACT) test was performed, which assesses clotting factor II in this situation, and the blood clotted within the expected timeframe (<120 seconds).
I sent him home with vitamin K tablets for 3 weeks anyway, since the owners were still quite concerned and we wanted to rule out the possibility of a 1st generation rodenticide being used. 

Would a rat poison that prevents clotting also cause a drop in the platelet count?

Rodenticides specifically target clotting factors II and VII of the intrinsic pathway, which are prothrombin and proconvertin. It doesn’t directly affect platelets, but with enough blood loss, platelet count can drop. Testing for platelet count alone wouldn’t be diagnostic, though. 
Ideally, I should have run tests on prothrombin (PT) , activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and proteins induced by vitamin K antagonism (PIVKA) as well as the ACT test, but our clinic doesn’t keep these in stock, and usually a clinical history and ACT test is sufficient for a diagnosis.

the-vet-life:

mylifeasaprevetstudent:

the-vet-life:

A dog was suspected to have possibly eaten a box of rat-bait in the garden, and was brought to the clinic.

Rat baits are separated into 1st and 2nd generations, but the general mechanism they involve is the blocking of the vitamin K pathway, stopping the production of clotting factors II and VII. Most products nowadays are 2nd generation, as they only require one dose to be fatal, instead of multiple cumulative doses.

Animals that ingest rodenticides suffer from internal haemorrhaging and external blood loss, and can die within hours (if 2nd generation) to days/weeks (if 1st generation).

An activated clotting time (ACT) test was performed, which assesses clotting factor II in this situation, and the blood clotted within the expected timeframe (<120 seconds).

I sent him home with vitamin K tablets for 3 weeks anyway, since the owners were still quite concerned and we wanted to rule out the possibility of a 1st generation rodenticide being used. 

Would a rat poison that prevents clotting also cause a drop in the platelet count?

Rodenticides specifically target clotting factors II and VII of the intrinsic pathway, which are prothrombin and proconvertin. It doesn’t directly affect platelets, but with enough blood loss, platelet count can drop. Testing for platelet count alone wouldn’t be diagnostic, though. 

Ideally, I should have run tests on prothrombin (PT) , activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and proteins induced by vitamin K antagonism (PIVKA) as well as the ACT test, but our clinic doesn’t keep these in stock, and usually a clinical history and ACT test is sufficient for a diagnosis.