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zeldathemes

I'm a graduate of animal and veterinary biosciences and am now undertaking my doctor of veterinary medicine masters degree at the university of melbourne.

This blog is a record of my experiences while studying for my dream job. every all nighter, every caffeine fuelled early morning and every exciting adventure.
If you'd like to know more follow the link at the top.
Up there you'll also find links to my personal blog, and my amazing and inspirational animals.

If you're a veterinary blog i'd love you to message me so i can follow you :)
CONSULTATIONS, AUSCULTATIONS & PALPATIONS
vetgirlblog:

Fact sheet about tendons and ligaments (Download here)

vetgirlblog:

Fact sheet about tendons and ligaments (Download here)

fuckyeahdinoart:

Godzilla 2014 Muscles Diagram by cheungchungtat

fuckyeahdinoart:

Godzilla 2014 Muscles Diagram by cheungchungtat

jaz-myvetlife:

Part of the design I did for the exotics group’s new shirts!

jaz-myvetlife:

Part of the design I did for the exotics group’s new shirts!

Horses are born on earth with two thoughts: homicide or suicide.
My visiting path prof from Auburn. 
veterinaryhumor:

Thanks vet school!

veterinaryhumor:

Thanks vet school!

biologicalmarginalia:

Bear teeth from Teeth.

This image proved invaluable when slogging my through the works of an extravagant taxonomist for The Patriarchal Bear. Long story short, he was probably full of crap.

The taxonomy of this image is a bit eccentric itself; ‘Thalarctos' is the polar bear (normally Ursus maritimus) and ‘Selenarctos' is the Asian Black Bear (normally Ursus thibetanus). Apparently ‘Ursus' encompasses both American Black and Brown Bears. The latter two bears belong to a separate branch known as tremarctines; Tremarctos is still extant (and known as Spectacled Bears) and Arctodus are the extinct deep-faced bears from North America.

king-amphy:

llbwwb:

PSA:My Mother never told me this! Reblog to save a baby Bird:)

JUST A LITTLE HISTORY FACT MY GRANDFATHER TOLD ME:The reason this myth was a thing, was because back in the 30’s-50’s or so ( I can’t remember the time)There was a parasite that was living in birds. It was hard to explain it to children, so they basically made up this myth so children wouldn’t touch the birds incase it carried the parasite.THE MORE YOU KNOW YEA?

king-amphy:

llbwwb:

PSA:My Mother never told me this! Reblog to save a baby Bird:)

JUST A LITTLE HISTORY FACT MY GRANDFATHER TOLD ME:
The reason this myth was a thing, was because back in the 30’s-50’s or so ( I can’t remember the time)
There was a parasite that was living in birds. It was hard to explain it to children, so they basically made up this myth so children wouldn’t touch the birds incase it carried the parasite.
THE MORE YOU KNOW YEA?

veterinaryhumor:

harlequinq:

Vet Tech Olympic Events…..so true.

Had a coworker who wanted to submit ‘pouring the exact number of pills out of a bottle’ as an event idea!

What is the shark cull? Sorry, I don't live in Australia.

Anonymous

hopefulveterinarian:

No worries :)

In response to the increased number of shark attacks (7 fatal attacks in 3 years), the Western Australian government has decided to catch and kill tiger, bull, and great white sharks that are 3m or longer. The idea is to reduce the population of “dangerous” sharks in the area and therefore decrease the risk of fatal attacks in the future. 

Drum lines are being set up ~1 km from the shoreline to catch the sharks. Those that are at least 3 m long are then shot in the head by licensed fishermen until dead and discarded at sea. Last I heard, 36 sharks have been caught so far, but 32 were released because they were undersized. The number of sharks that survive after being released is unknown which is a tad disconcerting as there have been reports stating that the captured sharks are susceptible to being injured by the hooks and/or being attacked by larger sharks. I’m also having trouble finding more (official) information on the number and species that have been caught/released/shot.

Associate Professor Adam Stow of Macquarie University (and at least one other scientist in basically every article about the shark cull) has stated that the effects of this cull are not limited to the areas in which they occur and that the bigger picture needs to be taken into consideration when discussing the impact it will have on marine life and their environment. This need is further emphasised when you take into account that for tools such as drum lines to produce noticeable reductions in the number of shark attacks, they will need to be implemented on a consistent and regular basis.

Scientists, conservationists and academics have stated that there is little to no scientific evidence to justify this cull and that the money should have gone towards behavioural research and the development of shark deterrent technology. If I’m not mistaken, they are currently testing beach enclosures for swimmers in the area and researchers at the Uni of WA have developed wetsuits that deter shark attacks. I believe it would be more beneficial to direct more of this focus towards developing technology that will help us deter sharks or even reduce encounters, you know, instead of killing them for entering these ~Coastal Shark Management Zones~ lol. I have not been able to find enough (scientific) evidence to prove that the wetsuits work to deter sharks, and the tracking systems currently being used by the WA Department of Fisheries in hope to reduce encounters isn’t exactly helpful yet due to the low number of sharks being tracked. 

I think that’s pretty much it? (feel free to let me know if I’ve gotten something wrong or left something out) :)

jtotheizzoe:

via wnycradiolab:

The Science of Animal Locomotion by Eadweard Muybridge, in GIF form.

"Zoopraxography" is the best word I have encountered in 2014.

Thanks to the Internet Archive, you can read Muybridge’s 1893 edition of Descriptive Zoopraxographyon its original pages, free online.

nightowl-lionheart:

MY FIRST CALVING! Mazel tov, it’s a boy!

😊 reblogging to my vet blog

the surgery bug

So it’s week two of my first final year extramural placement.
I’ve had a huge input in consults and the vets are starting to throw me in on their own and ask for my input in front of clients because they trust my judgement (their words not mine!), and consults have always been a great love of mine.. but in this last week I have definitely caught the surgery bug.
I haven’t necessarily been thrown into surgery everyday, but I’ve speyed a cat and a dog, and repaired an aural haematoma solo. These might sound a bit mundane to the well experienced vet, but to a budding vet - it’s super exciting. I’ve also got to see two very very experienced surgeons take on more complex surgeries, and that’s been unbelievably awesome.   
So basically, in my periodic absences from tumblr - here’s a little update; life is awesomeimage

:)

  #vet school    #vet student    #final year    #placement